Tour for Diversity in Medicine

#T4DFlorida Day #1: From Mentee to Mentor

I thought I knew what to expect when I was accepted to be a mentor for the Tour for Diversity in Medicine. I figured that I would be talking to young adults who needed advice and guidance as they embarked on a journey that I am all too familiar with. While that is true, I didn’t expect the impact that meeting not only the students who signed up to participate in the tour, but also my co-mentors would have on me. Today at Bethune-Cookman University I was able to speak to over 100 college students about how they can be successful in the medical field, which is something that I’ve been doing throughout my career as a medical student. I expected this to be a routine “knowledge dropping” day; I expected session after session of things that I not only knew but experienced. What I didn’t expect is to be absolutely awed by the people I had been accepted to work with. My co-mentors amaze me. I watched many of the sessions and wished that I had been able to receive the information and guidance as an undergraduate student. I wished that I had known that there were doctors and healthcare professionals that looked like me and cared that I wanted to pursue some kind of career in medicine. I wished that I knew that while these people have accomplished amazing things and overcome astronomical obstacles, they’re still just people and they are looking to reach back and relate to someone like me. Interacting with the students was also a humbling experience. They were so eager for advice and truly respected me, which is something that made me feel valued as a mentor.

Day 1 of #T4DFlorida has already given me a greater appreciation for the mentor/mentee relationship, as i was fortunate enough to experience both roles today.  I really hope that at least some of the students who asked for my email address reach out to me in the future!

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Website services & Tour Photos: Errol Dunlap